Some thoughts on the frustrations of carrying out Brexit-related research (in the UK)

Myself and Albert co-authored a blogpost at the University of Bristol’s Law School blog reflecting on the frustrating state of trying to undertake EU law research in these times of Brexit and fitting it into the good old REF framework. Here’s a snippet:

Brexit, its research and its teaching are increasingly becoming a field of study on their own—see eg the illuminating contributions to the special issue edited by C Wallace & T Hervey on ‘Brexit and the Law School’ (2019) 53(2) Law Teacher 133-229, some of which build on the earlier series of SLS ‘Brexit and the Law School’ Seminars, one of which Albert had the pleasure to host at the University of Bristol Law School in July 2017. This seems rather natural, as it is hard to overstate the impact that Brexit is having on the work of academics active in all areas, but particularly for public and EU law scholars. In this post, we offer some personal reflections on the frustrations of carrying out Brexit-related research, some of which are related to Brexit and its unforeseeability, while others are derived from more general constraints on the ways legal research is published and assessed.

Sentences to ponder [Research]

From the NY Times:

Possibly the biggest barrier to open access is that scientists are judged by where they have published when they compete for jobs, promotions, tenure and grant money. And the most prestigious journals, such as Cell, Nature and The Lancet, also tend to be the most protective of their content.

“The real people to blame are the leaders of the scientific community — Nobel scientists, heads of institutions, the presidents of universities — who are in a position to change things but have never faced up to this problem in part because they are beneficiaries of the system,” said Dr. Eisen. “University presidents love to tout how important their scientists are because they publish in these journals.”

As the title of column asks, should all papers be free? Academic publishing is probably the only line of business where the middleman receives the product for free, gets editors/reviewers to work on it for free and then re-sells it with a 25-39% net profit margin.